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Conclusion Re-Visioning Science and Indigenous Education in Africa: Meeting future challeges

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dc.contributor.author Asabere-Ameyaw, A
dc.contributor.author Dei, G.J.S.
dc.contributor.author Raheem, K.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-12-03T09:13:21Z
dc.date.available 2019-12-03T09:13:21Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.other 10.1007/978-94-6091-702-8_14
dc.identifier.uri http://ir.uew.edu.gh/xmlui/handle/123456789/459
dc.description Published in Contemporary Issues in African Sciences and Science Education en_US
dc.description.abstract This chapter draws upon the broader philosophical and theoretical implications of our understanding Indigenous science and science education in African schools. Today, we are having to contend with the crisis of ideas and imagination as we search for genuine educational options for young learners. African subjects have always played a central role in the conception, generation, design and implementation of knowledge. As already noted, it is through the mutual interrogation of ideas, concepts, principles, symbols, cultural and social values that the foundation of knowledge can be established. Tensions of the intellectual identity and the clarification of what is science are not new. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Sense Publishers en_US
dc.title Conclusion Re-Visioning Science and Indigenous Education in Africa: Meeting future challeges en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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