UEWScholar

Evaluation of airborne lead levels in storage battery workshops and some welding environments in Kumasi metropolis in Ghana

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Dartey, E.
dc.contributor.author Adimado, A.A.
dc.contributor.author Agyarko, K.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-11-29T09:49:21Z
dc.date.available 2019-11-29T09:49:21Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.other 10.1007/s10661-009-0869-x
dc.identifier.uri http://ir.uew.edu.gh/xmlui/handle/123456789/418
dc.description Published in Environmental Monitoring and Assessment en_US
dc.description.abstract Airborne lead levels were assessed in nine workshops, three each from battery, electronic repair, and welding sources within the Kumasi Metropolis in Ghana. Samples were collected at 0, 2.5, and 5.0 m away from the emission source at the workshops during working hours and another at 5.0 m during break hours. Airborne lead particulates were collected and analyzed using the filter membrane technique and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry, respectively. There were significant differences (p ó 0.05) among the air lead levels from the workshops. Workshop 3b produced the highest significant values of air lead concentrations of 2,820.31 ñ 53.89, 2,406.74 ñ 71.87, 754.55 ñ 72.52, and 549.01 ñ 67.30 ?g/m3 at distances of 0, 2.5, 5.0, and 5.0 m (break-time measurement), respectively, while workshop 1w significantly produced the lowest air lead concentration values of 261.06 ñ 21.60, 190.92 ñ 36.90, 86.43 ñ 16.26, and 61.05 ñ 3.88 ?g/m3 at distances of 0, 2.5, 5.0, and 5.0 m (break-time measurement), respectively. The air lead levels reduced with distance from emission source at the workshops. At all the distances of measurement at working hours, the airborne lead levels were higher than the World Health Organization standard of 50 ?g/m3 and exceeded the threshold limit values of 100 to 150 ?g/m3 recommended in most jurisdictions. Workers and people in the immediate environs were exposed to air lead levels that were too high by most international standards, thus posing a serious threat to their health. ? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Airborne lead en_US
dc.subject Filter membrane technique en_US
dc.subject Flame en_US
dc.subject atomic absorption en_US
dc.subject spectrophotometry en_US
dc.subject Jurisdictions en_US
dc.subject Threshold limit values en_US
dc.title Evaluation of airborne lead levels in storage battery workshops and some welding environments in Kumasi metropolis in Ghana en_US
dc.type Article en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search UEWScholar


Browse

My Account